Teaching to Learn and Learning to Teach


Gospel Displayed in Another’s Life and Interaction with Me

How can your theology not change the way you respond to others failures? I’ve had many opportunities this semester to think about this. Far too often I have a head knowledge of the truth and come to find that “understanding” (it’s in quotes because as a former teacher I don’t really believe it is understood if it is not applied) does not filter down into my practical everyday beliefs. The Lord and one of my bosses have faithfully challenged me in how the gospel should transform my response to failures (others and my own). I know the gospel and I know that I should expect failure. I am an imperfect, fallen sinner who needs a Savior who is living in a broken, flawed hurting world with a bunch of other hurting, sinning, broken, flawed, imperfect humans. That is reality!  By the way, that reality would be very depressing apart from the real gospel truth that there is a Savior. I believe it, so why do I respond in frustration when I can’t control my circumstances or outcomes. Why do I respond with impatience, pride, and surprise when others fail? Why am I surprised when I see sin in my life? Sadly, my theology doesn’t change the way I live with other’s failures or my own the way it should. I want to be sinless that is my desire and expectation despite knowing glorification doesn’t occur on this side of Heaven.

 Theology should change the way you vote, as I pointed out in my last post, but it should also change how I respond to someone who couldn’t get the project done or how I respond when I can’t do the impossible, or how I respond to my own sin. I know a lot about God (theology) and a lot about man and yet too often I think, view, or try to act as God. I’m thankful for faithful people like my boss, who God uses to point this out as he extends grace when failure occurs in the office.

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